• INAH-Museo de la Escultura Mexica, Eusebio Dávalos Hurtado
    INAH-Museo de la Escultura Mexica, Eusebio Dávalos Hurtado
  • INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
    INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
  • INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
    INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
  • INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
    INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
  • INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
    INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
  • INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
    INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
Museo de la Escultura Mexica, Eusebio Dávalos Hurtado
This late-eighteenth-century retreat for the pulque magnates of Tlalnepantla now displays Mexica stone sculptures and pottery depicting nature, men and the gods, all within the setting of a stately residence.
About the museum

The galleries include displays of objects recovered from various sites around the Valley of Mexico, as well as some from excavations of the archeological zone of Santa Cecilia Acatitlan, and a dedicated space for Mexica sculptures as well as exhibits showing how people lived their daily lives in the region. Hidden away down narrow, cobblestone alleyways in Santa Cecilia Acatitlan, a neighborhood of Tlalnepantla, and partially hidden by the church of Santa Cecilia, this museum occupies a late-eighteenth-century mansion with a corridor and rooms ranged around a central patio.

It is named in honor of eminent physical anthropologist, Eusebio Dávalos Hurtado (1909-1968). The museum first opened its doors in 1964; it re-opened in 1982 and given a new exhibition design in 1996.

The sculptures were found at the site itself and also come from various locations around the Valley of Mexico, as well as from the states of Morelos and Veracruz. The first two galleries and garden are used for exhibitions of Mexica sculptures dating from the Late Postclassic (1300-1521), excavated from this site as well as from the Templo Mayor (Great Temple) and the National Museum of Anthropology. The sculptures are arranged according to three themes: “Landscape and natural resources in pre-Hispanic times,” showing figures of animals such as eagles, grasshoppers, toads, jaguars, tigers and snakes; “Physical traits and idealized forms of beauty in human figures” with necklaces, ear flares, masks and caps; “Religion and depictions of the gods,” such as Mictlantecuhtli, a Chac-Mool, and deities associated with forces of nature, such as the rain god Tlaloc. The exhibits are carved in materials such as tezontle, rhyolite, andesite and basalt. Displays in the garden include representations of shells, carved skulls and coiled snakes.

The four remaining galleries contain a collection of historical artefacts, and a living room, dining room and kitchen are decorated with period, domestic objects such as plates and jugs, photographs, religious images as well as furniture, to give a sense of daily life in the region. At the rear is a “tinacal,” a special type of vat used in the pulque-producing region.

November 1961
314351
INAH-FN
Interior view of the entrance to the Dr. Eusebio Dávalos Museum in Santa Cecilia Acatitlan, Tlalnepantla, State of Mexico, Mexico, ca. 1960
314358
INAH-FN
Partial view of the courtyard of the Dr. Eusebio Dávalos Museum in Santa Cecilia Acatitlan, Tlalnepantla, State of Mexico, Mexico, ca. 1960
Practical information
Temporalmente cerrado

Tuesday to Sunday from 10:00 to 17:00 hrs

$55.00 pesos

  • Extra fee for video cameras
  • Extra fee for photo cameras
  • Extra fee for professional cameras
  • Sundays free for Mexican citizens
  • Free entrance for Mexicans under 13 years old
  • Free entrance for Mexican students and teachers
  • Free entrance for Mexican senior citizens
  • No Smoking
  • No entry with food
  • Pets not allowed
Callejón del Tepozteco, s/n, Pueblo de Santa Cecilia Acatitlán, 54130, Tlalnepantla, Tlalnepantla de Baz, México.

From Mexico City, take Calzada Vallejo or Eje Central to Tenayuca, then the Santa Cecilia-San Rafael avenue to the town of Santa Cecilia; or via the Jesús Reyes Heroles road, take the Santa Cecilia-San Rafael avenue.

By public transport: via Metrobus line 3 running from Lindavista to Tenayuca.


Services
  • Módulo de información
  • Sanitarios
  • Wifi
  • +52 (722) 215-7080, +52 (722) 213 9581. Ext. 198031.
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Directory
Responsable del museo
María Olivia Torres Cabello
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
01 (722) 213 9581 Ext. 198031
Cabeza de felino
Colección del Museo
Museo de la Escultura Mexica, Eusebio Dávalos Hurtado
Museo de la Escultura Mexica, Eusebio Dávalos Hurtado
11932
mexica
M-Escultura-Mexica-1
INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
Mexica Culture gallery 1
M-Escultura-Mexica-2
INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
Mexica Culture gallery 2
M-Escultura-Mexica-8
INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
Museum courtyard
M-Escultura-Mexica-9
INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
Museum gardens
M-Escultura-Mexica-6
INAH-Mediateca/Teresa Galindo
Gallery
19.5526482,-99.1741427
Texto © CONACULTA.INAH.Museo de la Escultura Mexica, Eusebio Dávalos CNME Imágenes © CONACULTA.INAH. Fototeca CNME.Gliserio Castañeda
306
Centro INAH Estado de México
18
B
Santa Cecilia Acatitlán
INAH-Museo de la Escultura Mexica, Eusebio Dávalos Hurtado

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