• INAH-Mediateca / Tresa Galindo
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    INAH-Mediateca / Tresa Galindo
  • INAH-Mediateca / Tresa Galindo
    INAH-Mediateca / Tresa Galindo
  • INAH-Mediateca / Tresa Galindo
    INAH-Mediateca / Tresa Galindo
  • INAH-Mediateca / Tresa Galindo
    INAH-Mediateca / Tresa Galindo
  • INAH-Mediateca / Tresa Galindo
    INAH-Mediateca / Tresa Galindo
  • INAH-Mediateca / Tresa Galindo
    INAH-Mediateca / Tresa Galindo
Museo de Sitio de Cacaxtla
A superb display of the Cacaxtla murals including the battle scene and the Jaguar Man, with information on how they were painted, as well as archaeological finds telling the impressive story of the Lords of Cacaxtla and their warlike people, inheritors of Teotihuacan and Cholula, and their gods such as Tlaloc.
About the museum
The exhibition design is based on a curatorial brief which puts the development of the pre-Hispanic city of Cacaxtla into context. This site museum, established in 1986, reveals the secrets of its mural paintings, whose designs and colors are still visible after 1,000 years. The idea is to bring the public right up to within a few inches of the murals by means of life-size reproductions. This is not possible with the originals and the reproductions show us the details of the Jaguar Man, one of the figures from the doorpost of Building A, the water scenes from the Red Temple and the Scorpion Man from the Temple of Venus, as well as other images. The murals have decorative and symbolic elements from the Central Highlands as well as the Mayan region. There were also influences from El Tajin and the Oaxaca region. The museum has a collection of 164 pieces, with the 11 sculptures of the Lords of Cacaxtla being a particular highlight.

The museum is housed in a building designed for the purpose. The design and building materials were chosen to harmonize with the region’s vernacular architecture, and also with the site’s pre-Hispanic structures. This ensures that the buildings fit in with the landscape instead of interfering with, or detracting from its surroundings.

The Cacaxtla murals were discovered by chance in 1975 and since then there have been various investigation and conservation projects which have turned up great quantities of archeological materials. The majority of the objects exhibited in the museum were found in the excavations of the site, alongside a few others found by chance in the surrounding area.

Visitors are welcomed by a basalt sculpture found on the land surrounding the Xochitecatl hill. It dates to the Late Preclassic (100 BC-200 AD), in other words long before Cacaxtla’s apogee. The gallery space is divided into: the Formative Period, covering the earliest settlement at Cacaxtla in the first centuries AD; Painting Techniques; Gods and Men; and the Epiclassic period (650-950), which covers the city’s apogee.

Among the archeological finds that visitors can see are burnishers, architectural items, sculptures of the gods Tlaloc, Xipe and Tlazolteotl, ceramics, cists (burials surrounded by four vertical slabs in a square with another serving as a cover), the aforementioned Lords of Cacaxtla, anthropomorphic figures, bones, ornaments and a pair of urns with modeled personages, one of which was found by the archeologist Beatriz Palavicini in 2008. There are also reproductions of maps and codices from the viceregal period such as the Codex of Cuauhtinchan.
October 1988
324704
Sinafo/INAH
324701
Sinafo/INAH
An exert point of view
Insights into the site’s cultural development
Aurelio López Corral
Aurelio López Corral
Centro INAH Tlaxcala
Practical information
Temporalmente cerrado

Tuesday to Sunday from 9:00 to 17:00 hrs

$80.00 pesos

  • Extra fee for video cameras
  • Extra fee for professional cameras
  • Sundays free for Mexican citizens
  • Free entrance for Mexicans under 13 years old
  • Free entrance for Mexican students and teachers
  • Free entrance for Mexican senior citizens
  • No Smoking
  • No entry with food
  • Pets not allowed
Circuito Perimetral s/n,
San Miguel del Milagro, C.P. 90720,
Nativitas, Tlaxcala, México.

From Mexico City take Federal Highway 150 towards the turn off for San Rafael Tenanyecac (km 99), continue to San Miguel del Milagro and follow the signs.


Services
  • Accesibilidad
  • Restaurante
  • Sanitarios
  • Tienda
  • Visitas guiadas
  • +52 (246) 416 0000
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Directory
Encargado de la Zona Arqueológica Cacaxtla- Xochitécatl
Yajaira Mariana Gómez García
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+52 (246) 416 0000
Museo de Sitio de Cacaxtla
Museo de Sitio de Cacaxtla
2014
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Museo de Sitio de Cacaxtla
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Texto © CONACULTA.INAH.Museo de Sitio de Cacaxtla CNME Imágenes © CONACULTA.INAH.Fototeca CNME.Gliserio Castañeda
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INAH-Mediateca / Tresa Galindo

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