189 Sites
Tlapacoya
A very ancient site in the Valley of Mexico, on the shore of Lake Chalco, which is practically dry today. It was one of the earliest ceremonial centers in Mesoamerica. Human remains from the site date back 25,000 years and the site is famous for its small female clay figures.
Estado de México
Altiplano Central
1719
Tlatelolco
A former center of government, Tlatelolco was a twin to Tenochtitlan, a friend and a foe, a companion in trade, construction, power, and religion; both were totally eclipsed following the Spanish Conquest. Many impressive remains are on view in their original location and in the site museum.
Ciudad de México
Altiplano Central
1700
Tohcok
Singular Maya city, small, rich and strongly hierarchical, it flourished 12 centuries ago. Two particular architectural styles dominate: Chenes and Puuc. Notable are the columns with circular base, well-braced false arches and vaulting, mosaics and masks with complicated filigree designs in stone.
Campeche
Sureste
1676
Toluquilla
Situated south of the Sierra Gorda, this city was inhabited from 400 AD until shortly before the Conquest. Miners and mineral workers, influenced by different cultures, left impressive constructions in the area.
Querétaro
Altiplano Central
1783
Toniná
Situated on the border of the Mayan highlands and the lowlands. A warrior state that overcame Palenque, and left a remarkable Acropolis, built of platforms one superposed upon another, and a pyramidal structure unique in the Mayan area due to its complexity and monumental size; it is even taller than the Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacan.
Chiapas
Sureste
1687
Tres Cerritos
A 1,600-year-old Purépecha site which was used as a sacred burial ground for centuries after it had been abandoned. This is demonstrated by the remains of 120 chiefs, servants and sacrificial victims, its rich offerings, the ruins of its buildings and the stones of the neighboring Santa María Magdalena monastery in Cuitzeo.
Michoacán
Occidente
1745
Tres Zapotes
Ancient Olmec city, contemporary with La Venta, which reached its height 3,700 years ago and ended 2,400 years ago. This culture produced some impressive colossal stone heads, and a famous stela with the second earliest date recorded in Mesoamerica, correlating to: September 3, 32 BC.
Veracruz
Golfo
1878
Tula
A key city in the history of the Altiplano (Central Highlands), the great Toltec capital from the year 1000 left vast remains full of monuments and artistic treasures. It influenced the peninsular and Central American Maya, and the cultures of the Gulf coast, Anahuac and the western regions.
Hidalgo
Altiplano Central
1736
Tulum
A powerful walled city on the coast, with some of the best preserved mural paintings in the Mayan area. Its monuments exemplify the particular style of the East Coast, where the ancient pointed arch gave way to flat roofs supported by columns.
Quintana Roo
Sureste
1808

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