189 Sites
Tzintzuntzan
The lakeside capital of the Purépecha and its vast independent empire had a population of 30,000 at the time of the Spaniards’ arrival. Founded eight centuries ago, it was the seat of the Uacúsecha dynasty. The impressive remains include the Great Platform with its semi-circular “yacata” pyramids, one of the most voluminous structures in all Mesoamerica.
Michoacán
Occidente
1746
Uxmal
Uxmal is a magnificent and monumental city, one that astonishes visitors with its Pyramid of the Magician, the Nunnery Quadrangle and the House of the Doves. This is the most representative Puuc-style site with its decorated facades with masks of the god Chaac, fret patterns, hieroglyphic panels and tall roof combs.
Yucatán
Sureste
1895
Vega de la Peña
On the banks of a river, convenient for trade, remarkable urban planning and the Fretwork Temple, whose facade decorations depict the serpent of fire. The Mexica held sway over the site, who took advantage of the communications network to exact their tribute.
Veracruz
Golfo
1879
Xcalumkín
An outstanding 1,000-year-old Puuc site that was capital of many surrounding settlements. It only has a few temples and palace structures, and no ball court, but Xcalumkin has an impressive number of hieroglyphic inscriptions about its rulers and other lower-ranked figures.
Campeche
Sureste
1677
Xcambó
The inhabitants of Xcambó settled in a petén, the largest in the region, with numerous useful features: soil, drinking water and materials for their buildings. The site was erected as a commercial port during the Early Classic period (c. 350-550 AD).
Yucatán
Sureste
17367
Xcaret
Pre-Hispanic port of departure to Cozumel for numerous pilgrims headed for the sanctuary of the goddess Ixchel, as well as a very important Maya trading city whose inhabitants navigated the Caribbean coast as far as Honduras. Its monuments are in the unique coastal style with large platforms and rounded corners.
Quintana Roo
Sureste
1809
Xelhá
Crucial maritime port for the Maya Caribbean, possibly serving the great kingdom of Coba 1400 years ago. Impressive structures remain, such as the Building of the Birds, with its outstanding mural paintings. This and other vestiges reveal the influence of Teotihuacan.
Quintana Roo
Sureste
1810
Xlapak
Twelve and a half centuries ago, the city of Xlapak supplied the Puuc region with agricultural products from land that was very fertile but lacked rivers. Medium-sized buildings are still standing, most notably The Palace, which is finely decorated with stucco facade masks of Chaac the rain god.
Yucatán
Sureste
1897
Xochicalco
The inhabitants erected beautiful pyramids and palaces upon impressive platforms in the mountains. Its extraordinary observatory is one of the most studied in Mesoamerica. The level of intricacy they achieved in the visual arts and their knowledge of engineering are plain to see. It is a World Heritage Site.
Morelos
Altiplano Central
1753

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